Friday, April 19, 2013

Finally, a new mold. Sea Turtle Bezel and Teardrop Cabochon

A couple of years ago I did this very rough sketch, so poor that I wrote the word 'cab' and drew a line to remind me of the idea. (In all fairness I was trying to draw whilst riding in the car with Joe.)

In fall of 2011, a land turtle bezel [the top drawing] and cab were sculpted but the sculpts were destroyed when we purchased our new home in Maysville and began to pack for the move.

A few months ago I began anew, this time with the sea turtle [the lower sketch] but life kept interrupting and the turtle was often pushed to the back of the sculpting table for more urgent needs. 

After a few more attempts at finishing it, I took some photos of the WIP [Work in Progress]. I colored the cabochon in Photoshop to make it more interesting. 

The bezel is about 3 inches long by 2 1/2 inches wide. There is a subtle shell pattern inside of the bezel.

The teardrop cabochon is 1 3/4 by 1 1/4 inches [30 x 42 mm]. If properly released the mold can be used for clear resin. If using polymer clay, any number of patterns, canes or solid clays can be molded. 
Inspired by this antique pin that I saw on the web recently, I moved it to the front of the table and began working on it. 

Tonight I finished the sculpture and baked it. When cool tomorrow, I'll do what ever is needed to make them both mold-able and taper the more pointy end of the cabochon as the profile is too high for my taste.
 The bezel can be molded in metal clay, polymer clay etc.  The cabochon may be molded or cast in any color or material. 

If polymer clay I can see the bezel molded in deep green, baked and antiqued with a soft yellow color, wiping the excess paint off before the paint is fully dry. This will leave light creases in the fine detail, much like a real sea turtle.
The side view shows the fine detail and the smooth cabochon. Note that the flippers are flat and the head is flat on the bottom. This is necessary to allow the molded part to be removed from the mold. After molding these parts can be lifted, turned, moved and shaped before baking or firing.

 
 I tried to get a soft expression on the face as this giant of the sea is gentle in nature often allowing humans to hang on for a short ride as they soar below the surface of the sea. 

Now that the largest elements for the mold is completed, I plan to sculpt a smaller turtle and teardrop cabochon for the mold. After all, a girl needs earrings or maybe some beads for a necklace. :-)  If there is room, I'll add one or two smaller teardrop cabochons. 


This mold will do dual duty. 
1. Provide unique teardrop cabochons 
2. Provide an original, unique and trendy bezel. 


I'll post here when it is ready to ship. 

Thanks for visiting my blog. 


Penni Jo Couch
Designer and sculptor of 


2 comments:

Joan Blackwell said...

What are the sizes? How much for one? Thanks. Joan Blackwell, blackjo1234@aol.com This is project for Lumbee Tribe Boys and Girls Club in Pembroke, NC.

Joan Blackwell said...

What are the sizes? How much for one? Thanks. Joan Blackwell, blackjo1234@aol.com This is project for Lumbee Tribe Boys and Girls Club in Pembroke, NC.